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 Taking On Sony, …A Recap in Vindictiveness
Relative Risk
 Posted: Apr 21 2011, 07:44 PM
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Days after Anon's hack attack, PSN is still experiencing widespread outages and there seems to be no sign of the Guy Fawkes collective yielding anytime soon.

This global group of hackers, best known for defending WikiLeaks, attacking the websites of the Westboro Baptist Church and, of course, YouTube Porn Day – has now turned their attention to Sony.

They first launched a successful DDoS attack on the company, bringing Sony.com and Playstation.com down for several hours on Monday.  They've since brought down the Playstation Network repeatedly (much to the chagrin of gamers worldwide) and even the website of the firm handling Sony's case against GeoHot.

For those of you who had no prior knowledge of this crisis, Anonymous itself has created an effective visual representation of their declaration against their titan adversary. Please excuse the typos- they're from the internets.


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It all began when Sony took legal action against hackers/jailbreakers George "GeoHot" Hotz and Alexander "Graf_Chokolo" Egorenkov after they began to use homemade programs on their PS3's, violating Sony’s terms of service (which neither of them supposedly agreed to.) The issue ignited a debate regarding the rights of consumers and their products, claiming that the system they purchased is theirs to use as they see fit in their own homes. Sony disagreed.

Thus, Anon saw it fit to strike back at the corporation by essentially shutting down its digital marketplace after mounting a coordinated attack via IRC.

They've also released this video via YouTube saying that Sony will now "feel the wrath of Anonymous" and that "These attacks will continue until we are completely satisfied with the outcome"

Anon also claims to be seizing sensitive information from Sony executives, such as a financial data as well as personal details (family members' names, address, etc.) with the hopes of using it against the corporation. Some users have been able to access the network despite these attacks, but many more are completely incapable of logging on. Sony does not openly acknowledge the involvement of Anonymous "activists," but has stated that it suspects foul play.

"We are currently investigating, including the possibility of targeted behavior of an outside party...If this is indeed caused by such act, we want to once again thank our customers who have borne the brunt of the attack through interrupted service. Our engineers are working to restore and maintain the services, and we appreciate our customers’ continued support."

- Patrick Seybold, Sony Senior Director of Corporate Communications and Social Media

Seybold has posted an update on the Playstation Blog (the European version of the blog reportedly went down some time ago for a brief period of time, supposedly due to Anon’s efforts), stating that they were working to bring the network back online. It’s expected that the first news of the PSN’s repair will appear on that same blog, so bookmark it and refresh every ten minutes until you get what you want. Sony’s been occupied with Anon’s assault for several days and it may be some time before the network is up and running again. So just sit back and watch the internet at its finest.

Sigh… somebody wake me when I can finally download Final Fantasy VII.

***Update***

Anonymous has released another video listing their 3 major demands of Sony.

The demands are as follows:

- Sony must allow for end-user modification of the PS3, as was available prior to the 3.21 firmware update.
- Sony must end any attempts to bring legal action to alter a product they own.
- Sony must not pursue legal action against any collected IP address.


Anonymous has received negative backlash from PSN users and because of this, has adjusted their battleplan:

"Anonymous is on your side, standing up for your rights. We are not aiming to attack customers of Sony. This attack is aimed solely at Sony, and we will try our best to not affect the gamers, as this would defeat the purpose of our actions. If we did inconvenience users, please know that this was not our goal."
^
KeVo
 Posted: Apr 21 2011, 10:28 PM
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I want to lash out so many F-Bombs, ugh. These dirt dumpsters are pissing me off. I'm all for people getting what was originally advertised, but this is not the way to do it. I wish these guys would get caught and arrested.
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Rick Grimes
 Posted: Apr 22 2011, 07:41 AM
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QUOTE (Relative Risk @ Apr 21 2011, 06:33 PM)
It all began when Sony took legal action against hackers/jailbreakers George "GeoHot" Hotz and Alexander "Graf_Chokolo" Egorenkov after they began to use homemade programs on their PS3's, violating Sony’s terms of service (which neither of them supposedly agreed to.)

Doesn't just using your PS3 mean you've agreed to Sony's TOS? I recall something in the manual to that effect.
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KeVo
 Posted: Apr 22 2011, 08:19 AM
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Doesn't just using your PS3 mean you've agreed to Sony's TOS? I recall something in the manual to that effect.

Yes, it does. =/
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Relative Risk
 Posted: Apr 22 2011, 07:44 PM
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With PSN still down, some people might think it’s hacker group Anonymous’ fault again. If so, you're incorrect.

The group has released a statement regarding PSN’s downtime and it’s not pretty.

While the Anonymous group does concede that the downtime might be the doing of splinter Anonymous members, or “Anons,” the press release states that these “Anons” are doing this by themselves, and that “AnonOps” is not related to this incident and does not take responsibility for what has happened.

Anonymous also thinks that Sony is “taking advantage” of the hacker group’s previous work to distract users from the fact that the downtime is actually an internal problem with Sony’s servers.

It ends with Anonymous calling Sony “Incompetent.”

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What’s very intriguing is how Sony has stayed silent in all of this. We’ve heard that the problem might have stemmed from Japan but other than that, Sony has yet to officially give a statement as to how and why this is happening other than telling the people that they will report back as they get more information.
QUOTE (KeVo @ Apr 22 2011, 12:17 AM)
I'm all for people getting what was originally advertised, but this is not the way to do it.

This wasn't about Linux, specifically. The hack let you run any custom OS on the PS3 and run any pirated game.

Hacking the OS is in violation of Sony's EULA. When you buy a PS3 and create a PSN account you're agreeing not to mess with the OS--they don't much care about hardware mods because that just voids the warranty--but messing with the OS is technically infringing on Sony's property rights.

If someone hacked my corporation and interfered with services, I'd sue them into third-world poverty. Seriously, start browsing real estate--and by that I mean load up MapQuest and pick which bridge you want to live under...

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Rick Grimes
 Posted: Apr 22 2011, 09:39 PM
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Well, if Anonymous says they didn't do it, they must be telling the truth because this collection of wannabe hackers behind numerous cyber attacks on PSN and Sony websites is just a beacon of truth and justice, right? rolleyes.gif

If this is a problem with Sony's servers, what reasoning would there be to hide it? Server problems arise all the time from any number of causes and an interruption of service is just one of the end results. It's not an occurrence limited to Sony and I fail to get how Anonymous can rationalize calling them, above all others, incompetent over it. I'm sure Xbox Live has its own occasional outages, too. Why aren't these clowns calling Microsoft incompetent? How about the other day when my Internet service was interrupted for an hour or so because of a server problem on my ISP's side. Does that make them incompetent, too?

Sony, just like any other corporation or individual person, isn't perfect. And Anonymous calling them incompetent over not being perfect is pretty damn childish, if you ask me.
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Rick Grimes
 Posted: Apr 25 2011, 12:13 PM
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News update.

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A source with close connections to Sony Computer Entertainment Europe reports that the attack to the PlayStation Network may be a bit deeper than originally reported by Sony. According to the source, who wishes to remain anonymous, the PSN sustained a LOIC attack (which created a denial-of-service attack) that damaged the server. There was also a concentrated attack on the PlayStation servers holding account information. In addition, “Admin Dev accounts were breached.”

As a result, “Sony then shut down the PSN and [is] currently in the process of restoring backups to new servers with new admin dev accounts.” The SCEE source said Japanese servers may be restored tomorrow while the U.S. and E.U. servers will likely be operational the following day.

While this information is only corroborated via a series of Facebook messages, it is certainly not a stretch. Sony Computer Entertainment America recently confirmed that it pulled down the PSN because of an “external intrusion.” This essentially means that hackers were to blame. Sony is officially conducting a thorough investigation. The PSN and Qriocity services were pulled offline by Sony on Wednesday, April 20.

There was plenty of speculation late this week that the Anonymous hackers group was to blame for the PSN downtime. The group previously targeted Sony in retaliation to the legal action against another hacker. Anonymous has since denied involvement in the current PSN downtime.

Again, this information is from a source who claims to have a very close connection with someone at SCEE. We take these reports for what they are at this time, but it is certainly a possibility. If you have information to share, please do so.

"Everyone deserves the right to know what’s been going on," the source wrote in an email.
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Col. Radec
 Posted: Apr 26 2011, 07:19 PM
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Yes, yes, Anon says all that, but the fact that they hacked in the first place, a week prior, spurred Sony into pulling the plug and going into this restructuring action. So Anon still has to share the blame.

I'm just irritated that I kan't Kombat with my buddies & kronies kuz of those k***sucking anonymous k***s!

Also, there's word going around that our credit card and personal info is also at risk.

It Only Does... Nothing.

Also, here's a helpful Q & A FAQ about what's happening now:

Link.
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KeVo
 Posted: Apr 26 2011, 07:42 PM
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Love that comic strip.

Hate what's going on. I have card information on my account, so I'm watching that carefully.
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Rick Grimes
 Posted: Apr 26 2011, 11:19 PM
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You all have no idea how tempting it is to give this thread a free pass on the "no F-bomb" rule... mad.gif

All because of Anonymous and their pointless war against Sony's copyright, millions of peoples' identities could potentially be stolen, ruining their credit for years.

Tell me, you bastards, is the right to "edit" your PS3 worth ruining millions of peoples' lives?
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KeVo
 Posted: Apr 26 2011, 11:24 PM
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QUOTE (Spartan198 @ Apr 27 2011, 12:08 AM)
You all have no idea how tempting it is to give this thread a free pass on the "no F-bomb" rule... mad.gif

All because of Anonymous and their pointless war against Sony's copyright, millions of peoples' identities could potentially be stolen, ruining their credit for years.

Tell me, you bastards, is the right to "edit" your PS3 worth ruining millions of peoples' lives?

Let's burn all of them mofo's on the stake!
^
Rick Grimes
 Posted: Apr 28 2011, 06:03 PM
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Okay, I'm as much in favor of an "open" console as anyone else, but Anonymous and their war against Sony is giving me a headache now. dry.gif
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Relative Risk
 Posted: Apr 30 2011, 04:22 AM
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QUOTE (Spartan198 @ Apr 22 2011, 11:28 PM)
Why aren't these clowns calling Microsoft incompetent? How about the other day when my Internet service was interrupted for an hour or so because of a server problem on my ISP's side. Does that make them incompetent, too?

Depends, are you dealing with Verizon? laugh.gif

In all seriousness, they're both to blame: the hackers took advantage of Sony's incompetence. Two, count 'em, two evils there. I'm growing tired of the extreme condemnation on either side.

But let's be judicious, at the end of the day it's the responsibility of the corporations to ensure consumer security. Sony failed. Accountability is divvied up evenly--hackers are traced and prosecuted; the corporation is investigated, sued into oblivion, and ultimately forced to upgrade security protocols; and credit card holders are reimbursed for any unauthorized transactions.

The only aspect of this whole ordeal I'm shocked by is how legal let Sony execs sit on the breach, when millions of credit card numbers were stolen. That's one hell of a liability.


This news article is too long, but important, please read:

QUOTE
Reports of Credit Cards Being Sold Surface as FBI, DHS Get Involved with PSN Investigation -- A list with possibly more than 2 million PSN credit cards is reportedly up for grabs.

Update: You can count Congress among those who want to know more about Sony's actions over the last week-and-a-half. The U.S. House Energy Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade (which falls under the House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce) has sent a letter to Sony boss Kaz Hirai requesting a variety of information. Noting that a hearing is coming up on May 4 to discuss data theft, the Subcommittee wants to know, among other things, how and when Sony became aware of the breach, when it notified authorities, why it waited to inform PSN users of the breach, and what leads it to believe credit card data has not been stolen. It wants its questions to be answered by May 6.

Original Story: Sony stated on Wednesday it was working with a law enforcement agency to help its investigation into last week's PlayStation Network breach that resulted in 70+ million users' personal data being stolen. The Federal Bureau of Investigation's cyber crimes unit, based in San Diego, has confirmed it's involved as has the Department of Homeland Security. This development comes amidst reports of a list up for sale which contains up to 2.2 million credit card numbers acquired in the attack.

The breach has been posited a number of times by Sony as being "malicious" and a "criminal act." It's clearly not the only one who believes so, given the two government agencies' involvement. The FBI confirmed to Kotaku yesterday that it's been in contact with Sony and is looking into the matter. "The FBI is aware of the reports concerning the alleged intrusion into the Sony on line game server and we have been in contact with Sony concerning this matter," said FBI special agent Darrell Foxworth. "We are presently reviewing the available information in an effort to determine the facts and circumstances concerning this alleged criminal activity."

"The Department of Homeland Security is aware of the recent cyber intrusion to Sony's PlayStation Network and Qriocity music service," DHS spokesman Chris Ortman told NextGov (via Gamasutra). "DHS' U. S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team is working with law enforcement, international partners and Sony to assess the situation."

The Federal Trade Commission is also aware of what's happened, and while a spokeswoman said she "can't comment on whether the FTC is investigating," she did say the FTC could have jurisdiction in a case where personal data is lost through a security breach.

Attorney generals from at least 22 states have meanwhile followed the lead of Connecticut Senator (and former A.G.) Richard Blumenthal in openly questioning Sony about how it's conducted itself since the attack took place.

"The fact that sensitive information was apparently accessed without authorization makes me especially concerned about the possibility of financial fraud and targeted phishing scams," Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen said in a letter (PDF) sent to SCEA President Jack Tretton earlier this week. "What is more troubling is Sony's apparent failure to promptly and adequately notify affected individuals of this large-scale breach."

He also goes on to note Sony has made no mention of "any consumer assistance or protections that may be forthcoming from Sony. Nor has there been any public reporting about refunds or other compensation that may be offered by Sony to compensate users for periods in which the network or services were unavailable to them." Among other things, he's asking Sony to detail how PSN was hacked, reveal the number of consumers affected, and share its plan to prevent another attack.

In a second Q&A posted on the PlayStation Blog last night, Sony primarily addressed concerns related to gaming. Trophies, friends lists, and PlayStation Plus cloud saves will be unaffected and should begin working properly once PSN is brought back online. (The most recent estimate pegged next Tuesday as the day when "some services" may begin to come back online.) The most interesting answer in the post was a reiteration that Sony is "currently evaluating ways to show appreciation for your extraordinary patience as we work to get these services back online." Hulu has already credited users for the lost time and Sony Online Entertainment will soon try to make amends.

But there are much more serious issues to deal with in the meantime. The New York Times reported late last night that, according to security researchers, a list with up to 2.2 million credit card numbers (along with addresses, names, email addresses, and more) is being sold by hackers. Sony was allegedly given the chance to buy the list itself. Patrick Seybold, who has been the lone individual from Sony providing updates on the situation over the last week, said about the claim, "To my knowledge there is no truth to the report that Sony was offered an opportunity to purchase the list." He also pointed to Sony's previous statement that it has "no evidence that credit card data was taken" while continuing to warn users it can't be certain that credit card data is safe.

The Times report says word of the list comes from security researchers noticing "discussions on underground Internet forums." That hardly seems like the most reliable way to learn about something of this magnitude. As such, the veracity of the list's existence has to be called into question, and no one can blame you for ignoring the story altogether. However, claims of fraud involving users' PSN credit cards -- including an incident with 1UP contributor Steve Watts -- are cause for concern. It might be purely coincidental, but stories like that have to make one wonder how effective Sony's encryption on credit card info really is.

Contrary to Sony's initial claim that it never asked for users' credit card security codes (the three-digit number on the back of a credit or debit card), Destructoid found this is not the case -- when first signing up for PSN, the number is requested. The statement has since been corrected though Sony continues to insist the security code was not stored on its servers and was therefore not at risk to be stolen.

As users rush to order new cards -- as well they should -- analysts estimate (via Kotaku) the cost of replacements for lenders could total upwards of $300 million. Cards cost between $3 and $5 to replace plus there is the loss of money being spent while the card is shipped. That should be of no concern to users who are completely right to err on the side of caution, but it's an interesting aside to see how widespread the impact is of what started out as nothing more than the inability to log into PSN. It's no stretch of the imagination to foresee more lawsuits against Sony joining the one filed earlier this week.
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Rick Grimes
 Posted: Apr 30 2011, 12:08 PM
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QUOTE (Relative Risk @ Apr 30 2011, 03:11 AM)
Depends, are you dealing with Verizon?   laugh.gif

Not anymore. XD

QUOTE
In all seriousness, they're both to blame: the hackers took advantage of Sony's incompetence.  Two, count 'em, two evils there.  I'm growing tired of the extreme condemnation on either side.

But let's be judicious, at the end of the day it's the responsibility of the corporations to ensure consumer security.  Sony failed.  Accountability is divvied up evenly--hackers are traced and prosecuted; the corporation is investigated, sued into oblivion, and ultimately forced to upgrade security protocols; and credit card holders are reimbursed for any unauthorized transactions.

The only aspect of this whole ordeal I'm shocked by is how legal let Sony execs sit on the breach, when millions of credit card numbers were stolen.  That's one hell of a liability.

No, obviously Sony isn't entirely innocent, not by a long stretch. News of the possible credit card theft was all over the Internet days before I got the warning email from them when we should have been informed of it immediately, and Sony sure as shit should be penalized for it.

But Sony's failures aside for a moment, I still feel that the hackers, particularly Anonymous, are the root cause of all this and I'm not going deflect any blame away from them.

But all in all, I'm getting to be pretty mentally drained over this situation (only for the copyright issue elaborated on in the Skins thread to exacerbate the issue) and I've been trying to put it out of my mind for a couple days.


QUOTE
This news article is too long, but important, please read:

QUOTE
Reports of Credit Cards Being Sold Surface as FBI, DHS Get Involved with PSN Investigation -- A list with possibly more than 2 million PSN credit cards is reportedly up for grabs.

Update: You can count Congress among those who want to know more about Sony's actions over the last week-and-a-half. The U.S. House Energy Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade (which falls under the House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce) has sent a letter to Sony boss Kaz Hirai requesting a variety of information. Noting that a hearing is coming up on May 4 to discuss data theft, the Subcommittee wants to know, among other things, how and when Sony became aware of the breach, when it notified authorities, why it waited to inform PSN users of the breach, and what leads it to believe credit card data has not been stolen. It wants its questions to be answered by May 6.

Original Story: Sony stated on Wednesday it was working with a law enforcement agency to help its investigation into last week's PlayStation Network breach that resulted in 70+ million users' personal data being stolen. The Federal Bureau of Investigation's cyber crimes unit, based in San Diego, has confirmed it's involved as has the Department of Homeland Security. This development comes amidst reports of a list up for sale which contains up to 2.2 million credit card numbers acquired in the attack.

The breach has been posited a number of times by Sony as being "malicious" and a "criminal act." It's clearly not the only one who believes so, given the two government agencies' involvement. The FBI confirmed to Kotaku yesterday that it's been in contact with Sony and is looking into the matter. "The FBI is aware of the reports concerning the alleged intrusion into the Sony on line game server and we have been in contact with Sony concerning this matter," said FBI special agent Darrell Foxworth. "We are presently reviewing the available information in an effort to determine the facts and circumstances concerning this alleged criminal activity."

"The Department of Homeland Security is aware of the recent cyber intrusion to Sony's PlayStation Network and Qriocity music service," DHS spokesman Chris Ortman told NextGov (via Gamasutra). "DHS' U. S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team is working with law enforcement, international partners and Sony to assess the situation."

The Federal Trade Commission is also aware of what's happened, and while a spokeswoman said she "can't comment on whether the FTC is investigating," she did say the FTC could have jurisdiction in a case where personal data is lost through a security breach.

Attorney generals from at least 22 states have meanwhile followed the lead of Connecticut Senator (and former A.G.) Richard Blumenthal in openly questioning Sony about how it's conducted itself since the attack took place.

"The fact that sensitive information was apparently accessed without authorization makes me especially concerned about the possibility of financial fraud and targeted phishing scams," Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen said in a letter (PDF) sent to SCEA President Jack Tretton earlier this week. "What is more troubling is Sony's apparent failure to promptly and adequately notify affected individuals of this large-scale breach."

He also goes on to note Sony has made no mention of "any consumer assistance or protections that may be forthcoming from Sony. Nor has there been any public reporting about refunds or other compensation that may be offered by Sony to compensate users for periods in which the network or services were unavailable to them." Among other things, he's asking Sony to detail how PSN was hacked, reveal the number of consumers affected, and share its plan to prevent another attack.

In a second Q&A posted on the PlayStation Blog last night, Sony primarily addressed concerns related to gaming. Trophies, friends lists, and PlayStation Plus cloud saves will be unaffected and should begin working properly once PSN is brought back online. (The most recent estimate pegged next Tuesday as the day when "some services" may begin to come back online.) The most interesting answer in the post was a reiteration that Sony is "currently evaluating ways to show appreciation for your extraordinary patience as we work to get these services back online." Hulu has already credited users for the lost time and Sony Online Entertainment will soon try to make amends.

But there are much more serious issues to deal with in the meantime. The New York Times reported late last night that, according to security researchers, a list with up to 2.2 million credit card numbers (along with addresses, names, email addresses, and more) is being sold by hackers. Sony was allegedly given the chance to buy the list itself. Patrick Seybold, who has been the lone individual from Sony providing updates on the situation over the last week, said about the claim, "To my knowledge there is no truth to the report that Sony was offered an opportunity to purchase the list." He also pointed to Sony's previous statement that it has "no evidence that credit card data was taken" while continuing to warn users it can't be certain that credit card data is safe.

The Times report says word of the list comes from security researchers noticing "discussions on underground Internet forums." That hardly seems like the most reliable way to learn about something of this magnitude. As such, the veracity of the list's existence has to be called into question, and no one can blame you for ignoring the story altogether. However, claims of fraud involving users' PSN credit cards -- including an incident with 1UP contributor Steve Watts -- are cause for concern. It might be purely coincidental, but stories like that have to make one wonder how effective Sony's encryption on credit card info really is.

Contrary to Sony's initial claim that it never asked for users' credit card security codes (the three-digit number on the back of a credit or debit card), Destructoid found this is not the case -- when first signing up for PSN, the number is requested. The statement has since been corrected though Sony continues to insist the security code was not stored on its servers and was therefore not at risk to be stolen.

As users rush to order new cards -- as well they should -- analysts estimate (via Kotaku) the cost of replacements for lenders could total upwards of $300 million. Cards cost between $3 and $5 to replace plus there is the loss of money being spent while the card is shipped. That should be of no concern to users who are completely right to err on the side of caution, but it's an interesting aside to see how widespread the impact is of what started out as nothing more than the inability to log into PSN. It's no stretch of the imagination to foresee more lawsuits against Sony joining the one filed earlier this week.

Is DHS investigating this sort of thing common? Their jurisdiction is obviously nation-wide, but I figured it was primarily the FBI's territory.
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Rick Grimes
 Posted: May 1 2011, 03:12 PM
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